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Mortgage Protection Insurance

By LEONARD J. DEL GALLO JR., M.S., MPAS(sm), CFP®           (www.DELGALLO.COM)

Mortgage Protection Insurance is one of the specialized insurance coverages that may help a family during difficult times and very few people know about it. Although life insurance coverage is there to protect in the event of death, this type of specialized coverage can do much more with many types of optional and standard riders that are available to add to the insurance policy. A typical policy can add many types of riders that may help cover costs in the event of disability, unemployment, accidental death, and critical illness. Other riders may enable accelerated death benefits, living benefits, return of premium, and/or a waiver of premium in the event of residential damage, to name a few of the many riders that can be available with this type of insurance coverage. Del Gallo Financial Services, LLC specializes in mortgage protection insurance because it can be a valuable tool and many times has simplified underwriting which can speed up the application process. Visit our website at DELGALLO.COM.  Del Gallo Financial Services, LLC can help guide you through the selection of a carrier that may provide your family the best coverage available at a reasonable price and also spend time with you to review you’re planning needs.

 

Any questions please contact Del Gallo Financial Services, LLC by visiting our website at DELGALLO.com. Del Gallo Financial Services, LLC can arrange an educational seminar or workshop for your organization’s members and/or employees. This research commentary is intended to educate families so they may gain an introduction to a difficult planning topic and is not intended for any other purpose. Del Gallo Financial Services, LLC and its’ representatives do not provide tax or legal advice. Please consult your tax advisor or attorney for guidance on such matters and before implementing any strategies and/or updates to your planning. Del Gallo Financial Services, LLC is a Registered Investment Advisor and Licensed Insurance Agency.

 A Research Perspective on Life Planning and Monitoring For Families of Children with Special Needs

 By LEONARD J. DEL GALLO JR., M.S., MPAS(sm), CFP®           (www.DELGALLO.COM)

A disability can have a dramatic impact on all family members. According to the 2003 U.S. Census, over 77 million Americans, or more than 27 percent of the U.S. Population were disabled (Stone 64).  It is critical for families to prepare for unforeseen events (Stone 65). “Statistical studies indicate that a significant portion of the adult population provides care for chronically ill, disabled, or aged family members” (Stone 64). As result, families and planners need to review estate plans, multi-generation family issues, government benefits, trusts, and life planning issues (Stone 64-66).

Disability is defined as the inability to do something, deprivation, or lack of physical, intellectual or emotional capacity (Merriam-Webster). Disability has been defined as an environmental problem, whereas other teachers define the term as a person-centered problem or deviation from the norm (Carter, et al.). A person with a disability could be considered having a special need and learning to take care of this need for a caregiver can be like waking up in Norway without the ability to speak the language (Stone 65). The learning process can take time.  A Certified Financial Planner® professional, with expertise in special needs planning, can guide families through government and community assistance programs to educate them in the fundamentals of the system (Stone 65). 

Family resources can be dependent on the level of family income and families with children with disabilities are often facing poverty or severe stress on their budget (Turnbull, Turnbull, Wehmeyer). “There are an extensive number of educational impacts related to poverty, but the one we will highlight here is the capacity of families from poverty backgrounds to attend school activities and teacher parent conferences” (Turnbull, Turnbull, Wehmeyer). A common misconception is that parents who are not active attending events may lack interest in their child but it may be the lack of financial resources, transportation, self-confidence, or inability to get time off from a low-paying job (Turnbull, Turnbull, Wehmeyer). A family that is living in poverty is more likely to have a child who is late developing vocabulary, lower IQ, and lower reading level (Turnbull, Turnbull, Wehmeyer). Financial planning may help families avert poverty and reduced access to resources (Stone 65).

Parents are not alone in the responsibility of caring for a child with a disability.  Grandparents are becoming primary caregivers across all ethnic groups and socioeconomic backgrounds (Gallagher, Kresak, Rhodes 56 ). Grandparents who are taking care of children without a parent present may be on a fixed income and 33.9% are living below the poverty level (Gallagher, Kresak, Rhodes 57). Planning can minimize the stress, physical health concerns, isolation, anxiety, and depression faced by many grandparents who suddenly find themselves as caregivers for a child with a disability (Gallagher, Kresak, Rhodes 57). Grandparents require resource information on transportation, behavior, funding, insurance, community, medication, housing, education, and skill development (Gallagher, Kresak, Rhodes 60). A well written family plan can prepare a caregiver to help a child with a disability. One study demonstrated that once grandmothers receive specific information to answer their questions they are better able to meet the needs of their grandchildren with disabilities (Gallagher, Kresak, Rhodes 61).  “Many grandparents have assumed parenting roles at great personal expense, filling a great family and community need; with needed supports, the grandchildren in their care, those with special needs and their typically developing siblings, will make progress and have successful lives” (Gallagher, Kresak, Rhodes 62). Grandparents and siblings as primary and secondary caregivers are significant and can increase under certain economic and social conditions, while the stress and concerns can be reduced with appropriate planning and education (Gallagher, Kresak, Rhodes 63).

Financial planning can help each family member by eliminating or reducing the financial burden and legal struggles that can occur during or after a disability is discovered (Stone 65). A Certified Financial Planner® professional can help by coordinating assets, documents, programs, and benefits (Stone 65). Nonprofit organizations, websites, medical professionals, and other resources can also provide information to minimize economic hardship and personal exhaustion for caregivers (Stone 66).

Planning for the lifetime of a child may involve; government programs, wills, trusts, guardianship plans, letters of intent, risk management techniques, and communication among family members (Dixon).  “A conventional estate plan will rarely meet the needs of an individual with disabilities and may even prove to be detrimental by causing a loss of federal and state assistance, residential services, or health care benefits” (Dixon). It is critical that families obtain and maintain eligibility for benefits to provide financial and medical stability for the disabled individual during their lifetime (Stone 66).

The two major federal programs that provide monthly income to the disabled are Social Security Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security Income and receiving eligibility can be an arduous and time-consuming process (Stone 66). Once a disabled individual is eligible and receives either Social Security Disability Insurance or Supplemental Security Income, they will be offered either Medicare or Medicaid which are both government offered health benefit programs (Stone 66). Medicare is offered in coordination with Social Security Disability Insurance and Medicaid is offered in coordination with Supplemental Security Income (Stone 66).

A will is a legal document that is created to determine how your estate is divided, identifies a guardian for minor children, and prevents the laws of the state from being the only method for dictating how your estate is distributed (Dixon). Parents are guardians of their children but once the child becomes an adult a parent must be appointed by the court to continue as a guardian and this may be done at the local Clerk of Court prior to a child becoming a legal adult (Dixon). If all remaining guardians were to die, the will would identify a successor guardian for the court to consider (Dixon). Within the will families use exclusion, disinheritance, direct bequests, and morally obligated gifts as methods for estate distribution (Dixon). Many options exist to pass financial resources and families should investigate all the option available before deciding on the best plan for their family (Dixon).

A trust is a flexible and efficient way to manage the assets of a family both during a lifetime and upon death (Dixon). A support trust and supplemental needs trust are two different types of trusts that are predominantly used for individuals with disabilities and can be most beneficial if created during a parent’s lifetime (Dixon). A support trust is utilized for any need of a beneficiary but is likely to disqualify an individual recipient from government benefits (Dixon). A supplemental needs trust if properly written will not disqualify an individual from government benefits and is designed to supplement, not supplant, government benefits and the trust cannot make a direct payment to the beneficiary or use trust assets for basic needs like food, clothing, and shelter (Dixon). A supplemental needs trust is used to purchase goods and services to enhance the beneficiary’s life and can be used to provide vacations, computers, companions, and other extras to enhance the quality of life for a disabled beneficiary (Dixon). A supplemental needs trust when properly written and managed is an exempt trust that requires the disabled person to have no access to the assets while funds within the trust can only be used for supplemental expenses that Social Security Income and Medicaid do not cover (Stone 70).   

The trustees and successor trustees are the individuals who are responsible for managing the trust and should be chosen with great care (Stone 70). Corporate trustees are an option to consider when family members need help, filling a role of final successor trustee, or used in cases where no other individual or agency is suitable (Stone 70). Fees and costs can vary depending on the services selected with a corporate trustee, time spent to review distributions, and other options selected to safeguard benefits (Stone 72). An attorney who specializes in creating supplemental needs trusts should be used along with a Certified Financial Planner® professional who can provide appropriate resources to help the caregivers upon the death or incapacitation of the parents (Stone 72). 

A letter of intent is a not a legal document but an important part of the future planning for a child with a disability and resource for a care provider (Dixon). The letter of intent will describe the history of a child, current status, hopes, dreams, goals, schedule, records, and insight into the needs of a child (Dixon). The letter may be placed on a computer to modify at least annually and should be accessible for all care providers (Dixon). A letter of intent should detail all aspects of the child’s life; history; future desires; housing/residential care; educational needs; employment history; medical care and management; behavior management; social environment; and religious environment (Dixon). There is no limit to the amount of information contained within a letter of intent and many families will provide a video to go along with written documentation (Dixon).

Planning is critical as families try to adapt to a disability in a household, the variables change; the age; health status, needs of the disabled person, availability of insurance programs, government funding laws, availability of support programs, and employment, are a few examples (Stone 74). Trusted and competent advisors can provide direction, pinpoint obstacles, and provide solutions (Stone 74). “Disability knows no limits of age, background, or occupation” (Stone 74). Life planning takes time to complete and monitor but every family should explore and address all aspects that apply to their child with special needs so no critical detail is missed (Stone 74). 

Any questions please contact Del Gallo Financial Services, LLC by visiting our website at DELGALLO.com. Del Gallo Financial Services, LLC can arrange an educational seminar or workshop for your organization’s members and/or employees. This research commentary is intended to educate families so they may gain an introduction to a difficult planning topic and is not intended for any other purpose. Del Gallo Financial Services, LLC and its’ representatives do not provide tax or legal advice. Please consult your tax advisor or attorney for guidance on such matters and before implementing any strategies and/or updates to your planning. Del Gallo Financial Services, LLC is a Registered Investment Advisor and Licensed Insurance Agency. 

  

                                                                                                    Works Cited

Stone, Constance A. “In the Blink of an Eye: Special Needs Planning.” Journal of Financial Planning. Oct. 2006: Vol. 19, Iss.10: 64-74. Print.

Turnbull, Ann, Rud Turnbull, Michael L. Wehmeyer. Exceptional Lives Special Education in Today’s Schools. 5th ed. Ohio: Merrill Prentice Hall, 2007. Print.

Dixon, Beth. Planning For The Future For Your Loved One With CdLS. CdLS-USA Foundation. Cornelia de Lange Syndrome Foundation, Inc. n.d.Web. 23 Mar. 2006.

College for Financial Planning® University Library. “dis·ability” Merriam-Webster’s Third New International Dictionary Unabridged. N. pag. 2002. Web. 14 Jun. 2010.

Gallagher, Peggy A., Karen Kresak, Cheryl A. Rhodes. Perceived Needs of Grandmothers of Children With Disabilities. College for Financial Planning® University Library. ProQuest. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education. Austin: May 2010. Vol. 30, Iss.1: 56-65. Web. 14 Jun. 2010.

Carter, Nari, et al. Educators’ Perceptions of Collaborative Planning Processes for Students With Disabilities. College for Financial Planning® University Library. ProQuest. Preventing School Failure. Washington: Fall 2009. Vol. 54, Iss.1: 60-71. Web. 14 Jun. 2010.

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Del Gallo Financial Services, LLC presents articles below from the Financial Planning Association (R) - Financial Planning Perspectives


Please follow our series of articles that are focused on informing readers about important issues affecting their planning.

8/1/16

FPA(R)  - Financial Planning Perspectives

                                                       

                                                 Will Your Money Last? Risks to Retirement Income
 
Description: To be viable, a retirement income strategy needs to account for the effects of longevity, inflation, health care expenses, and the uncertain future of Social Security.

Synopsis: A sound retirement income plan takes into account several financial risks, including the potential for the retiree to outlive his or her assets, the effects of inflation on future income, rising health care costs, and the uncertain future of the Social Security system. For example, inflation increases the future cost of goods and services; inflation can also erode the value of assets set aside to meet future costs if the assets earn less than the rate of inflation. In addition to these considerations, a plan should take care to avoid excessive withdrawals in the early years of retirement that could lead to premature depletion of assets. The overall objective of planning should be to create a sustainable stream of income that also has the potential to increase over time.

 Body:

With so much at stake when planning a retirement income stream, it pays to take a step back and see whether your plan takes into account the major obstacles to retirement income adequacy. When you take this big-picture view, consider the five major challenges most retirees face: the potential for outliving one's assets; the threat of rising living costs; the impact of increasing health care costs; uncertainty about the future level of Social Security benefits; and the damage to long-term financial security that can be caused by excessive withdrawals in the early years of retirement.


Understanding each of these challenges can lead to more confident preparation.

Examining the Issues


Longevity. While most people look forward to living a long life, they also want to make sure their longevity is supported by a comfortable financial cushion. As the average life span has steadily lengthened due to advances in medicine and sanitation, the chance of prematurely depleting one's retirement assets has become a matter of great concern.

Consider a few numbers: According to the latest government data, average life expectancy in the United States climbed to 77.9 years for a child born in 2007, compared to 47.3 years in 1900. But most people don't live an average number of years. In reality, there's a 50% chance that at least one spouse of a healthy couple aged 65 will reach age 89 (see table).1

Perspectives on Longevity: Probabilities of Reaching Specific Ages


Inflation, or the tendency of prices to increase, varies over time as well as from region to region and according to personal lifestyle. Through many ups and downs, U.S. consumer inflation averaged about 3% since 1926. If inflation were to continue increasing at a 3% annual rate, a dollar would be worth 54 cents in just 20 years. Conversely, the price of an automobile that costs $23,000 today would rise to more than $41,000 within two decades.

For retirees who no longer fund their living expenses out of wages, inflation affects retirement planning in two ways: It increases the future cost of goods and services, and it potentially erodes the value of assets set aside to meet those costs -- if those assets earn less than the rate of inflation.

Health care. The cost of medical care has emerged as a more important element of retirement planning in recent years. That's primarily due to three reasons: health care expenses have increased at a faster pace than the overall inflation rate; many employers have reduced or eliminated medical coverage for retired employees; and life expectancy has lengthened. In addition, the nation's aging population has placed a heavier burden on Medicare, the federal medical insurance program for those aged 65 and older, in turn forcing Medicare recipients to contribute more toward their benefits and to purchase supplemental insurance policies.

The Employee Benefit Research Institute has estimated that if recent trends continue, a typical retiree who is age 65 now and lives to age 90 will need to allocate about $180,000 of his or her nest egg just for medical costs, including premiums for Medicare and "Medigap" insurance to supplement Medicare. Because of the higher cost trends affecting private health insurance, the same retiree relying on insurance coverage from a former employer may need to allot nearly $300,000 to pay health insurance and Medicare premiums, as well as out-of pocket medical bills.

Social Security. The demographic forces that have led to an increasingly older population are expected to continue, putting more pressure on the financial resources of the Social Security system -- the government safety net that currently provides more than half of the income for six out of 10 Americans aged 65 or older.

In fact, the number of workers supporting each Social Security beneficiary through payroll taxes is projected to decline from 2.8 in 2013 to 2.1 in 2032. At that ratio there would not be enough workers to pay scheduled benefits at current payroll tax rates. If no action is taken to fix Social Security's financial problems, the system's trust funds may be exhausted by 2034.2 These trends have raised uncertainty about how Social Security can be financed in future years and whether benefit levels and eligibility requirements may have to be changed as the population continues to age.

Excess withdrawals. The decision about how much money may be safely withdrawn each year from a retirement nest egg needs to take into consideration all the risks mentioned above. But retirees also must consider the fluctuating returns that their personal savings and investments are likely to produce over time, as well as the overall health of the financial markets and the economy during their withdrawal period.

The stock market's collapse in 2008 after a short bull market illustrates the dangers of withdrawing too much too soon. Withdrawing 7% or even more per year from a retirement portfolio during the bull market years might have seemed a reasonable rate. But the ensuing bear market in stocks raised the possibility that the value of a retiree's portfolio might be reduced as a result of stock market losses, increasing the chance that the retiree would outlive his assets. According to one analysis, the average maximum sustainable withdrawal rate over any 30-year period for a balanced portfolio of stocks and bonds was 6.3% after adjusting for inflation. One strategy that may potentially avoid premature exhaustion of assets is to adopt a relatively conservative withdrawal rate of 4% to 5% a year. The same study showed that a withdrawal rate of 4% was sustainable in 95% of the periods studied.3

Addressing the Risks


While the risks discussed above are common to most people, their impact on retirement income varies from person to person. Before you can develop a realistic plan aimed at providing a sustainable stream of income for your retirement, you will have to relate each risk to your situation. For example, if you are in good health and intend to retire in your mid 60s, you may want to plan for a retirement lasting 30 years or longer. And when you estimate the effects of inflation, you may decide that after you retire you should continue to invest a portion of your assets in investments with the potential to outpace inflation.

Developing a realistic plan to address the financial risks you face in retirement may seem beyond you. But you don't have to go it alone. An experienced financial professional can provide useful information, as well as valuable perspective on the options for successfully managing what may stand in the way of your long-term financial security.

Source/Disclaimer:

1Source: Social Security Administration, Period Life Table, 2007 (latest available).

2Source: Social Security Administration, Fast Facts and Figures About Social Security, 2015. 3Source: DST Systems, Inc. This example is a compilation of all 30-calendar-year holding periods from 1926 to 2015, based on a portfolio of 60% U.S. stocks and 40% long-term U.S. government bonds, with annual withdrawals adjusted for actual historical changes in the Consumer Price Index. The example is not intended as investment advice. Actual sustainable withdrawal rates ranged from 3.7% to 11.4% in the periods studied. Please consult with your own personal financial advisor if you have questions about choosing a withdrawal rate and how it relates to your own financial situation.

Del Gallo Financial Services, LLC (DFS,LLC) does not endorse the (FPA(r)), Financial Planning Association (r), and makes no representation as to the completeness or accuracy of information provided from these articles, sites and sources. Nor is DFS, LLC liable for any direct or indirect technical or system issues or any consequences arising out of the client(s) access to or use of those articles, sites and sources. Del Gallo Financial Services, LLC’s (DFS, LLC) can provide access to its' Disclosures, Agreements, Privacy Notice, ADV II, and those reading these or any articles, sites, and sources should review, understand, and agree with all planning, legal, and tax implications with their own personal Attorney, CPA, and other financial professionals before implementing any recommendations or acting on any information for themselves or their family. These articles are not investment advice but are for general information purposes to begin the planning discussion with your own personal advisors, since every individual's circumstances are unique. DFS, LLC does not provide legal or tax advice. Del Gallo Financial Services is a Registered Investment Advisor and Licensed Insurance Agency. Please see DELGALLO.COM for additional details.

Required Attribution

Because of the possibility of human or mechanical error by Wealth Management Systems Inc. or its sources, neither Wealth Management Systems Inc. , Del Gallo Financial Services, LLC (DFS,LLC), nor its sources guarantees the accuracy, adequacy, completeness or availability of any information and is not responsible for any errors or omissions or for the results obtained from the use of such information. In no event shall Wealth Management Systems Inc. or Del Gallo Financial Services, LLC (DFS,LLC) be liable for any indirect, special or consequential damages in connection with subscriber's or others' use of the content.

Article by the FPA(R), Financial Planning Association(R) , "Financial Planning Perspectives"

© 2016 DST Systems, Inc. Reproduction in whole or in part prohibited, except by permission. All rights reserved. Not responsible for any errors or omissions.


7/1/16

FPA(R) - Financial Planning Perspectives

                                             

                                               Resources to Help Those Caring for a Loved One at Home

Description:
An overview of resources available to people caring for a family member or loved one at home.

Synopsis:
Being a caregiver can be overwhelming, particularly if you are juggling other responsibilities, such as working or raising a family. Knowing where to turn for help can make a difference -- both in the quality of care your loved one receives and in lessening the stress and responsibilities on you. This article provides some of the resources you can turn to for help.

Callout:
Being a caregiver can be overwhelming, particularly if you are juggling other responsibilities, such as working or raising a family. Knowing where to turn for help can make a difference -- both in the quality of care your loved one receives and in lessening the stress and responsibilities on you.

 

  Body:

If you provide home-based care to a loved one, you are not alone. Millions of Americans provide unpaid family care every year. 

Being a caregiver can be overwhelming, particularly if you are juggling other responsibilities, such as working or raising a family. Knowing where to turn for help can make a difference -- both in the quality of care your loved one receives and in lessening the stress and responsibilities on you.

Where to Go for Assistance: Elder Care Support


If the person you are providing care for is 65 or older, there are many resources available to you. One of the first stops to make is the U.S. Administration on Aging (AoA), which can be found online at www.aoa.gov. The AoA is dedicated to helping "elderly individuals maintain their dignity and independence in their homes and communities."

The AoA also maintains a Web site called the Eldercare Locator (www.eldercare.gov) that can help caregivers find local agencies that provide home and community-based services such as transportation, meals, home care, and support assistance.

Other helpful online resources:

-     The Medicare website (www.medicare.gov) details the various types of home health care services that are covered under Medicare and furnishes tools designed to help those in need of care choose home health care providers. Be sure to access the booklet "Medicare and Home Health Care."


-    ElderCarelink (www.eldercarelink.com) is a referral service consisting of over 50,000 senior care providers across the United States and includes nursing homes, assisted living facilities, adult daycare, and home care services.


-    The Visiting Nurse Association of America (VNAA) website (www.vnaa.org) has a database of visiting nurses in your area. The VNAA is an association of individuals who provide cost-effective health care to the elderly and the disabled.


-     If your loved one is a veteran, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (www.va.gov) provides a detailed listing of VA health care benefits. Additional services can be obtained from the nonprofit Disabled American Veterans (www.dav.org), including claims assistance and transportation to VA hospitals.


-     The consumer-facing site of the National Association for Home Care and Hospice (www.nahc.org/consumer) offers guidance and resources to help caregivers find services in their area.


-     Both the National Cancer Institute (www.cancer.gov) and Cancer.Net (www.cancer.net) have extensive sections devoted to caregivers that include guidance on finding support services, including home health care.


Where to Go for Assistance: Caregiver Support


The National Family Caregivers Association (NFCA) has a wealth of resources for caregivers at its Web site (www.thefamilycaregiver.org), including an online support network and a library of helpful tips on topics ranging from reducing stress to care management techniques. Other resources include:

-     The Family Caregiver Alliance (www.caregiver.org) started as a small task force created to assist San Francisco-based caregivers. It has now grown into a national organization dedicated to advancing the development of high-quality, cost-effective programs for caregivers in every state.


-     AARP (www.aarp.org) has a number of online communities devoted to caregivers, including those specific to loved ones who are suffering from cancer and Alzheimer's. There is no age requirement to participate in any of AARP's communities.


-     The National Alliance for Caregiving (www.caregiving.org) also has online resources to help those who are providing help to others, including its Family Caregiving 101 site (www.familycaregiving101.org), which offers education and support.


The average family caregiver works either full or part-time -- in addition to nearly 20 hours of care per week.* Those responsibilities really add up. So do your best to heed the advice of the many advocacy groups encouraging caregivers to carve out some time to take care of themselves, both physically and mentally.

Source/Disclaimer:

Del Gallo Financial Services, LLC (DFS,LLC) does not endorse the (FPA(r)), Financial Planning Association (r), and makes no representation as to the completeness or accuracy of information provided from these articles, sites and sources. Nor is DFS, LLC liable for any direct or indirect technical or system issues or any consequences arising out of the client(s) access to or use of those articles, sites and sources. Del Gallo Financial Services, LLC’s (DFS, LLC) can provide access to its' Disclosures, Agreements, Privacy Notice, ADV II, and those reading these or any articles, sites, and sources should review, understand, and agree with all planning, legal, and tax implications with their own personal Attorney, CPA, and other financial professionals before implementing any recommendations or acting on any information for themselves or their family. These articles are not investment advice but are for general information purposes to begin the planning discussion with your own personal advisors, since every individual's circumstances are unique. DFS, LLC does not provide legal or tax advice. Del Gallo Financial Services is a Registered Investment Advisor and Licensed Insurance Agency. Please see DELGALLO.COM for additional details.

Required Attribution

Because of the possibility of human or mechanical error by Wealth Management Systems Inc. or its sources, neither Wealth Management Systems Inc. , Del Gallo Financial Services, LLC (DFS,LLC), nor its sources guarantees the accuracy, adequacy, completeness or availability of any information and is not responsible for any errors or omissions or for the results obtained from the use of such information. In no event shall Wealth Management Systems Inc. or Del Gallo Financial Services, LLC (DFS,LLC) be liable for any indirect, special or consequential damages in connection with subscriber's or others' use of the content.

Article by the FPA(R), Financial Planning Association(R) , "Financial Planning Perspectives"

© 2016 DST Systems, Inc. Reproduction in whole or in part prohibited, except by permission. All rights reserved. Not responsible for any errors or omissions.